Multibagger Stock Suggestions

Take stock as to the reason for filing bankruptcy. It’s time to ask those very hard questions. Was bankruptcy the only way out? Did I live beyond my means? How could I protect my income in the future? Did I have a budget? What was my financial strategy? Did I have a financial strategy? Sometimes, by looking back, you can avoid future mistakes and situation. Asking these and other questions and being 100% truthful with the answers can be the hardest part of rebuilding your credit.

Firstly to an example. Back in the mid 90’s I joined an Investment club in the UK. I knew a couple of the members from a local health club I was a member at. Knowing that I was (a) keenly interested in investment and (b) more knowledgeable than most of them, I was invited along.

Have you ever seen those long and lavish mission statements on a plaque of the corporate wall? Or, inscribed on a company’s stationery? Other popular places are on the back of business cards, on websites, brochures, and Report Printing. Yet, it’s the person who is “belly to belly” with the customer that is that company. It’s not the corporate crafted mission statement that defines that company’s image. It is the stock clerk, the teller, the barista, the ticket taker and the sales representative who has direct contact with their clients. Even in the non-profit world, many will become involved for the cause, yet the majority become involved because of a person – either someone they know, someone affected or a special someone who asked for their help.

Many people will find that hard to believe. The stock market has gone virtually nowhere for 10 years, they complain. My Uncle Joe lost a fortune in the market, they point out. While the market occasionally dives and may even perform poorly for extended periods of time, the history of the markets tells a different story.

Stay up to date on the latest news about your company and in your field. Read the business sections in the newspaper. Look at trade journals. Read your company’s company annnual report. Pay particular attention to stories that might indicate the market for widgets (or whatever your company does) is going south.

Ironside was clearly not one of Vancouver’s finest citizens. He was well-known to police. He had made an earlier attempt to extract money from our sister paper, The Province, after it reported he had torn up an apartment in what appeared to be a drug-induced rage. Eventually, he realized we were playing hardball and went away.

This question makes me laugh. People must think I have a lot of time on my hands or something. They must think I stay up all night going through company reports and balance sheets? Maybe they think I have a team of researchers camped out in my living room that I employ to personally interview company executives of promising firms?

Case studies are short and to the point. Usually no longer than 800 words (one to two pages). Try to include one graphic per page. It breaks up the copy. But more than one tends to make it hard to read and not well put together.

And be smart about the size of your niche. Don’t go so narrow that you’re forever starved of work. Don’t go so broad that people view you as a Jack or Jill of all trades, a generalist.

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